Tag Archives: Toni Crowe

What Success is To You   

 The Daytime Lives of the Ladies of the Night

Our last author on the tour is once again Toni Crowe. She wants to tell us what success is to you. The Daytime Lives of the Ladies of the Night is the follow-up to the debut memoir by Toni Crowe. The Daytime Lives makes you think about your life and your definition of success. 

Daytimes Lives

Have  you ever wondered: “What do the women who sell their bodies and souls at night do in the daytime?  What do these women want out of life? 

This follow-up to Never a $7 Wh**e continues to detail the lives of three escorts: Baby, Essence, Irish and their new  trainee, Tee.  

As the four ladies struggle with the isolation associated with how they are living, The Daytime Lives of the Ladies of the Night reminds us that peace is within anyone’s reach, if they have the desire and determination to change their destinies.  

Excerpt from Daytime Lives of the Ladies of the Night ***

       Prince turned to me and said, “Hey, I need you to do me a favor.” 

I looked at him suspiciously and responded with, “Oh, a favor?”  

He said, “Yeah. I left my wallet at home, so I don’t have any money on me. I owe Ed here five hundred dollars. Ed said if I don’t give him his five hundred dollars right now, he’s going to have his two guys take me out in the bush and beat the living shit out of me until they get five hundred dollars’ worth.” 

I was stunned. Even though Essence had told me something was coming, I was still stunned by what Prince was trying to do to me. My grandfather had called this one the “You a Sucker” scam. It worked well as long as the sucker thought they were saving a loved one from a horrible fate. The scam took many forms, and Prince was playing his version out pretty well. I guessed he had run this scam a hundred times. 

I innocently asked, “What does this have to do with me, Prince?” I knew my mark. 

“Well, Ed thinks you are one sexy woman. He said that if you would give him a blowjob, he’ll write off the entire five hundred dollars. There’s a bedroom upstairs. You and he can go up there discreetly. Once you give him a blowjob, he will forgive the entire five hundred dollars.” 

I said, “Prince, I want to make sure I understand. You owe him five hundred dollars?” 

“Yes, I owe him five hundred dollars,” Prince said. 

“You don’t have the five hundred dollars with you?” I asked. 

“No,” Prince said. 

“But I’m certain we have five hundred dollars back at Tara, back at the house,” I responded sweetly. 

Prince didn’t miss a beat and said, “Yes, but Ed is not willing to wait for it. He wants his money right now. So you have to give him a blowjob right now.” 

Prince looked deep into my eyes, and he said, “How much do you love me? How deep is your love? Are you willing to see me beat to crap over a single, lousy blowjob?” 

I winced, thinking about how ashamed I was to be in this situation. My grandfather would spin in his grave. Prince took my wince to mean he had gotten to me—that he was winning this game.  

He pressed on. “How much do you care about me? If you cared for me, you would do this for me.” 

I stared at the floor. I could feel any love I had left for him sliding out of my feet and out onto the floor like a living thing. I was a mark, nothing more. I was a sucker for this man. Prince thought he had me.  

His voice was soft and sweet. “Tee, you would make sure I don’t get hurt. You would be my girl. You would be my savior. It’s one lousy blowjob.” 

I said, “Yes, you’re right. How much money do we owe him again? I want to make sure I understand.”  

He confirmed the debt was five hundred dollars, and then he smiled that beautiful hundred-watt smile at me, knowing I was going to acquiesce. I stood up at the same time that Ed did, and he reached for my hand. I did not take his hand. Instead, I reached into my purse. I pulled out the money I had stuffed in with my lipstick earlier. I had six hundred dollars. I counted out five hundred dollars for Ed, and I handed it to him.  

I looked at Prince and said, “There is nothing I wouldn’t do for you, baby. I think we have a much better solution.” 

At that moment, I knew that I was one blessed woman. I had struggled with telling Essence where her little boy was. I was so worried about the consequences if Prince or Baby had found out. But I was all in. My heart told me that I needed to tell Essence and so I did. Her heads-up regarding this situation had prepared me for something unusual. Her money had helped me escape this time. 

End Excerpt  

Author Bio 

 

Toni Crowe, BSEE, MSM, CLA, PE is the bestselling author of the $7 Journey series.  

She is an award winning and accomplished executive with 30 years of experience as a CEO/President, Vice-President, Director, Engineer, and Manager across multiple sectors including high tech, consumer and nuclear sensors, Aerospace,  film production and glass.  

Toni has extensive experience in P&L, Manufacturing, Operations Management, and Lean.  She has participated in a number of mergers and acquisitions.   

Toni is currently the CEO of  Just One,  her company which is dedicated to changing lives, one life at a time, by insuring that no one has to make the same mistakes she made.  

 

Buy Daytime Life of the Ladies of the Night to remind someone what success is really about.  

 

https://smile.amazon.com/Daytime-Lives-Ladies-Night-Boardroom-ebook/dp/B07GT9KYZK 

 

How to Grab the Next Rung on Your Career Ladder with Bullets and Bosses

Grab the Next Rung On Your Career Ladder

Welcome Toni Crowe to our 12 Days of Christmas. Her book Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends, How To Navigate Tough Challenges at Work  is a book about learning to be the best you can be at work.  

Discover how to handle tough peers and tougher bosses from one of America’s top Executives. 

With a honest, compelling look at relationships with peers and bosses alike, discover a pragmatic approach to mastering your trek through management. You will navigate common challenges in the workplace and conquer them with your personal style.  

What Will YOU Learn 

In Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends, you’ll discover: 

  • – A behind-the-scenes peek at corporate America that shows you what it’s really like at the top  
  • – Which skills and attitudes you need to scale to the top of the business world 
  • – How to cultivate a relationship with your boss that benefits both of you 
  • – What you can do when confronted with difficult peers so you maintain control 
  • – How you can and should deal with workplace treachery, and much, much more!  

Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends is a series of true stories from Toni Crowe’s life in the corporate world, each with a practical lesson and a set of exercises you can apply to your own career. If you like the personal approach of a mentor, tales of hard-won success, and real-world advice from a CEO with an amazing record of achievement, then you’ll love Toni Crowe’s latest book.  third installment in the five-part My Journey from a Lady of the Night to the Lady of the Boardroom memoir!  

Excerpt from Bullets and Bosses *** 

Many people believe that being the boss is easy. It is not. There are numerous activities that are hidden from the everyday employee that would shock them. 

I was working for a toxic boss on a large, important project. The project involved castings, which are made by pouring liquid metal into a mold. Manufacturing parts with precision dimensions using this process is something of a magic trick. To add to the challenge, we didn’t have molds for this project.  

Normally, from start to finish, a casting takes about thirty weeks.

We had to make the part samples ourselves, check them, send them to a supplier for machining, check them again, and then send them to a supplier for painting.  

We developed a plan for the parts to travel from one supplier to the next, cutting us out as the middleman and bringing the lead time down from thirty weeks to twenty-five. On this project, those five weeks could make a huge difference to the production team, which wanted to get the sample parts back in-house as fast as they could to build up, first, the production prototype and then the units themselves.  

Both the production team and the parts procurement team reported directly to me. Despite enormous effort on my part and theirs, the parts did not come in at twenty-five weeks. They came in at twenty-six weeks.  

They were one week late. 

The day the parts were due but did not show up, my boss stormed into my office. His face was red, he was breathing hard, and his hands were clenched into tight fists. He walked straight toward me, and for a moment, I thought he might punch me.  

He climbed up on my desk and started kicking. He kicked my phone off the desk, then my paper clips, then my calendar.  

I didn’t get out of my seat. I just rolled my chair back against the wall while he was up on my desk kicking things around, hoping I didn’t get hit by anything. I was stunned into silence. He was not a skinny man. How upset was he to climb on my desk?  

When he had finally kicked everything off, he stared at me. “What was the timeline for this project?”  

I told him, “The schedule was thirty weeks.”  

He didn’t like that answer. “What did you tell me you and your team could do?”  

“I told you we could get it down to twenty-five weeks.” 

“Did you get it down to twenty-five weeks?”  

“No,” I told him, “I did not. I got it down to twenty-six weeks. I apologize for missing the plan by a week and only being four weeks ahead of the original schedule.” 

This appeared to calm him down a bit. He climbed off my desk.  

“Engineering is now behind twelve weeks, and you have only made up nine. I want you to see what you can do to make up the last three weeks we need to be on schedule for this project.” 

I stood up and pretended that my desk items were not scattered about on the floor.  

“Sure. I’ll make that happen.”  

My ability to “make that happen” was one of the reasons I did so well in my career. My second ability to stay calm and take the heat was the second. If you work in manufacturing, operations, or supply chains, there are multiple problems you must solve every day. When you are responsible for all of the parts that are needed to produce revenue products, 99.9% is not good enough. If the plant needs one million parts and you and your team provide 999,999, you have failed.  

Manufacturing and Operations are tough gigs. Sometimes, no matter what you achieve, it is never enough.  

End Excerpt *** 

 Disclaimer,

I have not read this book but after reading the excerpt I am fascinated with the story. Staying calm at all times takes practice. Obviously Toni learned to do this and succeed. Well done.

Janis